All Albums

with reviews

Shirley Nanette ‎- 1973 – Never Coming Back

In the early seventies, Hank Swarn and Shirley Nanette collaborated on a project called ”Never Coming Back”. Swarn had been on the road for five years, lending his guitar-backing talent to Earl Grant and his band. While on tour, he wrote some tunes that were…

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Terence Trent D’arby – 1987 – Introducing The Hardline According To Terence Trent D’arby

One of the greatest records of the 80’s, an album that did so much for me, offered so much to me, an album that I still play, that still sounds great. It mixed soul and funk with the pop sound of the day. It offered up…

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The Supremes – 1964 – Where Did Our Love Go

Ladies & Gentlemen: The Supremes have arrived! A transitional album, as this combines some of their earlier minor hits like ‘Run, Run, Run‘ and ‘A Breath Taking Guy‘, alongside their Top 40 breakthrough ‘When The Lovelight Starts Shining Through His Eyes‘ and their trio of…

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Chic – ‎1978 – C’est Chic

A bright, shining example of what mass-produced, intelligent dance music should be. This is one of the top 5 disco albums and a pinnacle from the best band since the big band era. It exploded with confidence and talent to spare onto an unsuspecting audience…

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The Controllers – 1979 – Next In Line

The Controllers made some bad bad slow jams. In fact when I start a Slow Jam Hall Of Fame they’ll be in it. They sing from the heart, emotive, deep soul. I remember when I bought their first album back in 77, Somebody’s Gotta Win…

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The Meters – 1970 – Struttin’

The Meters are struttin plenty here – stepping out with those hard, tight New Orleans grooves that practically changed the way funk sounded in the 60s! The album’s one of their classic trio for Josie Records – all of which are sublime – and like the others, it’s got…

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Gil Scott-Heron – 1971 – Pieces Of A Man

This album is a terrific introduction to GSH’s stuff and in my opinion his best album overall, edging out “Winter in America” and “South Africa to South Carolina,” and the Flying Dutchman classic “The Revolution Will Not be Televised.” No, you will not hear Gil’s…

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Melvin Van Peebles – 1971 – Sweet Sweetback’s Baadasssss Song

Breathtakingly unique, just like the movie, and undeniably fascinating. Although Earth, Wind, & Fire went on to have a long and fruitful career full of hits, their music never again sounded as unusual as it did here, which is kind of a shame, because this…

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Clarence Carter – 1968 – This Is Clarence Carter

A seminal debut from the great Clarence Carter – proof that there was still a lot of genius to be heard in southern soul at the time! The 60s were just about over when Clarence appeared on the recording scene – and it seemed that…

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Turner Bros. ‎- 1974 – Act 1

Original INSANELY RARE private Indiana LP by Turner Bros. on the MB label. Amazing soul/funk LP Check prices here  Incredible & ultra rare funk 70′ LP. Including top dance dj cut “Cause I Love You“. The Turner Brother’s ‎ Act 1, originally released on their own label…

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Skip Mahoaney And The Casuals – 1974 – Your Funny Moods

Heavenly harmony soul! Skip Mahoaney And The Casuals were one of the best vocal groups working in the independent soul market in the 70’s, and although they had a few small chart hits, most of their work on vinyl is always pretty darn hard to…

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R.B. Greaves – 1969 – R.B. Greaves

Ronald Bertram Aloysius Greaves III, 28 November 1944, Georgetown, British Guyana. This singer, half north American Indian, made his greatest impact with the 1969 single, ‘Take A Letter Maria’. A nephew of Sam Cooke, Greaves had built a career both in the Caribbean and in…

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Lonnie Liston Smith – 1975 – Expansions

Whether it be a hard-edged slice of funk or subtle jazz infused keys this record has everything. I have been repeatedly blown away by this since getting hold of it. “Expansions,” with it’s bouncing bassline and searing keys is immediately infectious. Donald Smith has a…

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Marc Sadane – 1981 – One Way Love Affair

In terms of rare grooves they don’t come much rarer than the sumptuous ‘One Way Love Affair’ from the hugely under-rated Marc Sadane.  A product of the mid seventies, Sadane fronted the band Tungsten Steele before embarking on a solo career that saw him tour…

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The Staple Singers – 1969 – We’ll Get Over

With the musical triumph of Soul Folk in Action the Staples decided to go for a somewhat different musical approch on their second Stax album. The overall sound and the band haven’t changed too much,except for the addition of Marvell Thomas (son of Rufus) on…

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The Awakening – 1973 – Mirage

Amazing spiritual jazz / jazz funk lp by The Awakening, it became a classic album in the genre, essential stuff!! A jazzy sextet based in Chicago in the early seventies with Sunny Murray. This was their second and final effort from 1973 on the ultra…

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Bobby Blue Bland – 1973 – His California Album

“His California Album” was a return to form for Bobby “Blue” Bland. Having turned his personal life round in 1971, he turned his career round in 1973. For the first time in nearly ten years, his album charted, spending nineteen weeks in the US Billboard…

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Eddie Floyd – 1971 – Down To Earth

The bold, ambitious Down to Earth represents Eddie Floyd’s most daring break from the classic Stax sound. Produced and arranged in collaboration with the great Steve Cropper, its muscular soul sound draws heavily on psychedelic rock sensibilities, favoring extended jams, mutating tempos, and thick, bubbling rhythms. Cropper’s scorching guitar is…

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Freda Payne – 1971 – Contact

This Lp might be one of the pinnacles of Holland/Dozier 70’s production style on their Invictus/Hotwax Label. After the huge success of “Band Of Gold” on Freda’s previous LP, they no doubt put a lot of effort into this followup, and in some ways it’s…

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Lou Rawls – Merry Christmas, Baby

Of the major R&B stars of the 1960s and ’70s, Lou Rawls was the singer who seemed most comfortable slipping into the easy groove of Las Vegas-style lounge belting, which is no insult — Rawls had both the voice and the musical instincts to sing straight-ahead soul, jazz, or…

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