All Albums

with reviews

Experience Unlimited – 1977- Free Yourself

Let HOPE be bigger than FEAR.  Stay CALM and be POSITIVE. But, stay HOME and LISTEN to some FUNK and SOUL. One of the great forgotten sounds of mid-70s Funk was the Washington D.C.-based ensemble Experience Unlimited (later shortened to Eu). Though best later known…

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Diana Ross – 1973 – Touch Me In The Morning

Diana Ross is an iconic superstar. This album, originally released in 1973 when Diana was 29 and at the height of her popularity is one of the most cohesive of her career. The title track was her 2nd solo No1 in the US and came…

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Marlena Shaw – 1969 – The Spice of Life

 Cut for the Cadet label in 1969, Spice of Life ranges from soul and proto-funk to jazz and MOR-hued material. Shaw shines throughout, showing her power on politically charged, Aretha-styled cuts like “Woman of the Ghetto” and “Liberation Conversation“, while also delivering supple interpretations of…

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Martha Reeves & The Vandellas – 1972 – Black Magic

Review by RDTEN1 The final studio credited to Martha Reeves and the Vandellas, 1972’s “Black Magic” tends to get ignored by critics and fans.  That’s unfortunate given that while far from perfect, the collection had more than its share of pleasures.  Looking at the credits,…

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Fred Wesley & The J.B.’s – 1974 – Breakin’ Bread

  An oft-overlooked gem from the JBs, their last album for People Records, and a stone funk classic that’s every bit as essential as the others! The band is still in fine fine form, with none of the fast-funk or proto-disco of some later recordings…

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Betty Wright – 1972 – I Love the Way You Love

A very nice mix of Southern soul with a splash of smooth soul and funk here from Miami soul singer, Betty Wright. The stupendous soul belter, “Clean Up Woman” is a very familiar song due to the heavy sampling of the opening riff in hip…

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Little Beaver – 1974 – Black Rhapsody

LITTLE BEAVER goes instrumental and MIAMI FUNK grooves!!! If you love soul and you love Jazz, especially ’70s SOUL JAZZ, you can’t go wrong with this gem. A tight, well produced album… fans of Cornell Dupree, Boogaloo Joe Jones and Melvin Sparks should love this….

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The Spinners – 1967 – The Original Spinners

This was the Spinners’ first album. They previously recorded for Harvey & Gwen Fuqua’s Tri-Phi label but only released a handful of singles, and no LPs, from May 1961 to December 1962. The confusing title leads you to believe that the guys had been around the recording scene much…

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Curtis Mayfield – 1975 – There’s No Place Like America Today

While Mayfield’s preceding two albums Sweet Exorcist and Got to Find a Way were mostly a-political affairs – especially when placed next to Curtis, Curtis/Live!, Superfly and  Back to the World, he returned to the preaching fold with his ’75 effort, the dark, brooding ‘There’s…

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Bobby Womack – 1973 – Facts of Life

Bobby Womack recorded something of a concept album with ‘Facts of Life’ in 1973. Both in lyrical content as in sound (save maybe for the all-out rock closer “All Along the Watchtower”), there’s a sense of longing and heartbreak here draped in warm, carressing soul…

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Blo – 1973 – Chapter One

Blo is most known for being the first rock band to emerge from Africa. This trio includes Berkely ‘Ike’ Jones on guitar, Laolu ‘Akins’ Akintobi on drums and Mike ‘Gbenga’ Odumosu on bass. Each member has also worked in Ginger Baker’s band, Salt prior to their formation in 1972. ‘Chapter One’ is one of the most sought after African albums, despite the fact that it…

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The Bar-Kays – 1974 – Cold Blooded

A slept-on jewel of funk rock and greasy, laid back politically minded soul…  Come 1974, Stax Records was in trouble financially, but as far as the Bar-Kays were concerned, this didn’t really change anything much. The label had struggled with the band’s drive towards hard…

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Lamont Dozier – 1977 – Peddlin’ Music On The Side

For his second Warner Bros. LP, Motown veteran Lamont Dozier turns the production reigns over to Stewart Levine (The Crusaders, Minnie Riperton’s Adventures in Paradise, Hugh Masekela). Pianist Joe Sample & bassist Wilton Felder of The Crusaders are on hand to make stellar contributions, giving Dozier his most jazz flavored album. As usual with a Lamont Dozier album, you…

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The Staple Singers ‎- 1971 – The Staple Swingers

While The Staple Singers’ first two albums for Stax were superb, they didn’t prove to be huge commercial hits. Everything changed when the singing family began recording in Muscle Shoals, starting with the joyously titled ‘The Staple Swingers’.  It gave them their first hit on…

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Optimistics – 1970 – Optimistics

A rare gem produced by George Kerr. TURBO RECORDS TU 7001. Stereo. 1970 TURBO Records. ALL PLATINUM ENTERPRISES. VERY rare soul LP that rarely turns up for sale, one of the toughest Turbo releases in the catalog. Great sweet soul LP with “Should I Let…

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Billy Paul ‎- 1971 – Going East

After releasing Feelin’ Good At the Cadillac Club on Gamble Records in 1968 and Ebony Woman on Neptune in 1970, Billy Paul signed to a newly formed label in Philadelphia. It had been founded by two songwriters, musicians and producers. The label was Philadelphia International…

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Jackie Edwards – 1968 – Put Your Tears Away

Wilfred Jackie Edwards has claims to be Jamaica’s greatest balladeer as he possessed a rich deep voice to which he added velvet touches somewhat akin to Joe Simon. Every time you hear him sing a song you get something new. Early tracks like “Your Eyes…

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Archie Bell & The Drells – 1975 – Dance Your Troubles Away

Originally from Texas, Archie Bell & the Drells hit #1 with their first single recorded for Atlantic in 1968, the gold-selling ‘Tighten Up‘. In 1975, they signed to Kenneth Gamble and Leon Huff’s Philadelphia International subsidiary label TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) and recorded this…

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Mary Saxton – 1969 – Sad Eyes

Growing up in Edmonton in the late ’50s gave Mary Saxton musical influences that ranged from everything from Motown to big band to pop, and she put her talents to use at various live festivals and any other chance she could get to get on…

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Earth, Wind & Fire ‎- 1975 – That’s The Way Of The World

One of the great LP’s from the 70’s and indeed any era. A seamless blend of soul,funk and jazz all lovingly produced by the masters,namley Maurice White and Charles Stepney. As if that were not enough the songwriting is of the highest order with not…

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