Bobby Williams ‎- 1974 – Funky Super Fly

One of the all time indie funk classics of the 1970’s, obscure vocalist Bobby Williams gave James Brown a run for the money when he released “Funky Super Fly” in 1974. The style of the album recalls James Brown at his funkiest, but with a sound that’s even grittier featuring a tight horn section and some heavy funk jamming that really gets in the groove and stays there.

Copies of the original LP fetches big bucks on the rare groove collector’s market and fans of the album will be delighted to see it make its long overdue debut in the digital realm.

Tracks
A1 Funky Superfly (Part 1) 2.52
A2 Funky Superfly (Part 2) 2.53
A3 Morning Of Love 6.47
A4 Let’s Jam 3.41
A5 Teach Me 4.34
B1 Soul Brother Party (Part 1) 6.36
B2 Soul Brother Party (Part 2) 5.19
B3 Get Into It 5.36
B4 Make Yourself Funky  2.32
B5 Fair Trade 2.42

AllMusic Review by Jason Ankeny

To JB or not to JB, that is the question, and Bobby Williams answers in the affirmative with his 1974 debut LP Funky Superfly. There are worse ways to spend a career than imitating James Brown, and Williams does it with a style and energy second to none, with its raw indie label production and amphetamine rhythms, the album even boasts a gutbucket grittiness missing from the Godfather’s slick mid-’70s efforts.

The band certainly lacks the virtuosity of the J.B.’s — what backing combo doesn’t? — but the sheer edginess of the grooves and the raw exuberance of Williams’ vocals are undeniably potent; if you dig James Brown, you will dig this.